Locations/Picton

Annie Falconer

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Type: Shipwreck (two masted schooner)
Build: Wood
Location: Point Traverse
Nearest municipality: Picton
Depth: 70-80 feet (~75 meters)
Visibility: 20+ feet (7 metres)(depending on several facters, can be 40+)
Approximate length: 108 feet (33 metres)
Built: 1867
Sunk: 1904
Access: Boat
Level: Advanced


The Annie Falconer was built in Kingston Ontario by George Thurston and launched on May 22, 1867. She foundered in a violent storm on November 12, 1904. She was shipping a load of soft coal to Picton Ontario. The first mate died of exposure after the crew of seven made it to Amherst Island in the ships yawl boat.

The Annie Falconer is a very impressive shipwreck. She is broken in two, about two thirds of the way to the stern. Her stern lies at an angle and at the starboard side of the ship. The wheel and steering mechanisms are still in place. This is a good place to actually see how these ships were steered. As you head towards the bow of the wreck, you will notice there is still lots of rigging lying on and off the wreck. Belaying pins are scattered all over the deck and in the holds. The bow of the ships is the showcase of two huge anchors, they are completely steel. This was unusual for a vessel of this period. Because of the weight of the anchors, the ship's bow is starting to split. This only became noticeable around 1990, and has since increased in size to be very apparent, with the gap expanding yearly. This will in turn split the wreck in two right down the centerboard. Take the time to see this impressive wreck before this happens.

Cold is a factor when diving this wreck, as with all the deep wrecks it the Picton area. You may also want to bring a light, as visibilty can be extrememly bad depending on the time of day you dive her. The main line to the wreck is on the starboard side of the deck, about a 1/4 of the way to the stern from the bow. Have fun.

 
 
 
   

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